conference AGENDA

Sunday, February 17

5:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Check-In & Reception
Chancellor Green Rotunda

6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
Welcome Dinner & Keynote
Chancellor Green Rotunda

Welcome & Introduction: Co-Founders, FGLI Consortium

  • Kourtney Cockrell: Director, Student Enrichment Services (Northwestern University)

  • Khristina Gonzalez: Associate Dean of the College, Director of Programs for Access and Inclusion (Princeton University)

  • Devon Moore: Assistant Dean of Students in the College, Director of the Center for College Student Success (The University of Chicago)

Keynote Conversation: The Future of College Access and Opportunity for Lower- and Moderate-Income Students

  • Christopher L. Eisgruber: President, Princeton University

  • Daniel R. Porterfield: President & CEO, Aspen Institute

American Talent Initiative (ATI) leaders, Daniel R. Porterfield and Christopher L. Eisgruber discuss the future of college access and opportunity for lower- and moderate-income students. Porterfield is President and CEO of the Aspen Institute, an international educational and policy studies organization based in Washington, D.C. and Aspen, Colorado. Porterfield previously served as the 15th President of Franklin & Marshall College, Senior Vice President for Strategic Development at Georgetown University, and senior aide to U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Donna Shalala. Eisgruber has served as Princeton University’s 20th president since July 2013. As president, he has led efforts to increase the representation of low-income and first-generation students at Princeton and other colleges and universities. Princeton’s socioeconomic diversity initiatives have attracted national attention from The New York Times, The Washington Post, 60 Minutes and other news outlets. Eisgruber has also been a leading voice in Washington and elsewhere for the value of research and liberal arts education.

Monday, February 18

8:00 a.m. to 8:30 a.m.
Check-In & Breakfast
Carl A. Fields Center

8:30 a.m. to 9:15 a.m.
Morning Welcome
Carl A. Fields Center

  • Kourtney Cockrell: Director, Student Enrichment Services (Northwestern University)

  • Khristina Gonzalez: Associate Dean of the College, Director of Programs for Access and Inclusion (Princeton University)

  • Devon Moore: Assistant Dean of Students in the College, Director of the Center for College Student Success (The University of Chicago)

9:15 a.m. to 10:00 a.m.
Home Group Discussion
Carl A. Fields Center

Conference attendees will engage in small group discussions to learn more about each other and share goals and expectations for the conference.

10:00 a.m. to 10:20 a.m.
BREAK

10:20 a.m. to 11:20 a.m.
Workshop Session One
JRR Building; Rooms 301, 399, B60A, B60B, & B60C

It’s Not You, It’s Me: Strategies To Champion Systemic Change In Support Of FGLI Students
JRR Building, Room 301
Conference Theme: Collaboration for Institutional Change

  • Meghan Finn, LCSW, Care and Referral Coordinator (Northwestern University)

  • Rosemary Magana, LCPC, Staff Therapist, Liaison to LatinX Students (Northwestern University)

  • Abstract: Facilitators will discuss action toward systemic change and the collaborative care model they've created within Northwestern University's Counseling & Psychological Services to support FGLI students. Low income students have been actively recruited by Northwestern University in an effort to diversify our student body, through which a demonstrated need for supportive Student Affairs staff with experience in understanding their needs has become clear. In an effort to provide a successful path through the higher education system and to highlight student strengths, CAPS staff developed a consultative practice to promote 'wrap around' services, which in turn led to increased dialogue with other university offices including Student Enrichment Services, The Dean of Students Office, Residential Life, & The Office of Undergraduate Financial Aid. Facilitators will discuss collaborative opportunities to provide a myriad of resources, including mental health support, to FGLI students. Facilitators will discuss the importance of healthy university wide partnerships and perspective. Additionally, facilitators will discuss the critical importance of outreach and advocacy in creating a healthy environment for FGLI students – who disproportionately have difficulty requesting assistance and expressing their need. Finally, facilitators will discuss the need for ongoing self-reflection and self-care in work with FGLI students and toward systemic change.

Developing and Executing Sustainable Supports for First Generation, Low Income, and Undocumented Students
JRR Building, Room 399
Conference Theme: Collaboration for Institutional Change

  • Margot Cardamone, Associate Director for Student Success and Advising (Tufts University)

  • Robert Mack, Chief Diversity Officer, Associate Provost, and Assoc. Dean for Student Success and Advising (Tufts University)

  • Jared Smith, Student Success Advisor (Tufts University)

  • Abstract: In September 2018, Tufts University opened the FIRST Resource Center, joining five other cultural centers in supporting students with traditionally marginalized identities. This workshop will outline the process Tufts University used to establish a center to support first-generation, low income, and students with undocumented status with a focus on best practices that can be implemented at your institution. We will highlight the ways in which offices across the university collaborated to support these populations and how we continue to work together to break down barriers for our students.

Development of a Strategic, User-Friendly Portal for Student Academic Tracking and Early Intervention
JRR Building, Room B60A
Conference Theme: Collaboration for Institutional Change

  • Harvey Fields, Assistant Dean for Student Success (Washington University in St. Louis)

  • Abstract: Washington University in St. Louis, similar to many institutions of higher education (IHEs) is highly decentralized among, and within, academic and student affairs units. This contributes to challenges when administration wants to develop a cohesive, and comprehensive, profile of students - individually or by cohort. Typically, this work requires coordination and collaboration amongst multiple departments, individuals and systems, and can provide a barrier to the timely collection and distribution of accurate information. Washington University’s strategic plan has made provision for integrating student, and other, information systems in a central “data warehouse.” Full implementation of this strategy is not yet complete. However, Washington University’s Office for Student Success (OSS) has launched the Deneb STARS (Sustaining Talented Academically Recognized Students) cohort-based program to support the increased populations of High Achieving, Low Income (HALI) students admitted into, and matriculating at, the University. OSS has immediate need to have timely information on the academic status of program participants and has taken the initiative to develop, in partnership with the Office of the University Registrar and key academic units, an approach to addressing this problem. The approach uses Tableau generated dashboards and is compatible with the long-term strategic investment the University is making.

Top Down Mentorship: An Innovative Model of Peer Mentorship for the FGLI Community
JRR Building, Room B60B
Conference Theme: Student Empowerment

  • Sharitza Rivera, Assistant Director of Student Enrichment Services (Northwestern University)

  • Trebby Ellington, Hall Director (University of Michigan)

  • Kourtney Cockrell, Director of Student Enrichment Services (Northwestern University)

  • Abstract: Mentorship with FGLI students has become a hot topic in Higher Education. Expat research centers around experiences of mentees, while the learning and growth of the mentors are left in the margins. The SES Compass Peer Mentor program, now in its fourth year, has proven successful for both mentors and mentees. During this session, we will explain our innovative top-down mentorship model, share experiences and learnings from the mentors, and lead a discussion on current gaps and limitations of FGLI mentorship programs.

Using Community Cultural Wealth (CCW) to Center the Experiences of Low-Income, First-Generation Black College Women
JRR Building, Room B60C
Conference Theme: The Identities We Hold

  • Tieka Harris, Associate Director of the Educational Opportunity Fund Program (The College of New Jersey)

  • Abstract: Students across the United States are increasingly gaining access to higher education (USDOE, 2016a). For example, 11.7 million women were expected to attend college in fall 2016, compared with 8.8 million males. Black and Hispanic students attending degree-seeking institutions have also increased (USDOE, 2016a). Of all Black undergraduates at public colleges and universities in the US, 52 percent are women (Harper & Simmons, 2019). Given their increased enrollment and relative success (Zambrana & MacDonald, 2009), Black women in higher education must possess capital, though what they possess is not given its due in the research literature. Between 1991-2016, “only 48 articles were published on the experiences of Black college women in juried higher education related, psychology, and behavioral publications. In contrast, since 2001, over 62 publications have been written that are geared toward the collegiate experiences of Black undergraduate men alone,” (Patton, Crenshaw, Haynes, & Watson, 2016, p. 194). Knowledge of the lived experiences of Black women is limited and their voices remain silent. My recent dissertation study reckoned with the invisibility and silence of Black women. The proposed workshop will address the knowledge gaps around Black women in higher education, and will employ case studies to identify the forms of CCW low-income, first-generation Black women possess, and how they are impacted on college campuses. Attendees will identify ways to use the lenses of intersectionality and CCW to improve current practices and apply this information on their campuses.

11:20 a.m. to 11:45 a.m.
BREAK

11:45 a.m. to 12:45 p.m.
Workshop Session Two
JRR Building; Rooms 301, 399, B60A, B60B, & B60C

Empowering Undocumented Student Advocacy and Self-Care in the Post-2016 World
JRR Building, Room B60A
Conference Theme: The Identities We Hold

  • Devon Moore, Director of the Center for College Student Success (The University of Chicago)

  • Ireri Rivas, Director of Student Support Services (The University of Chicago)

  • Abstract: In the days and months following the 2016 election, many institutions found themselves scrambling to address the heightened needs and concerns of undocumented students. Through empowering student advocacy and collaborations, a team of administrators at the University of Chicago was able to develop a comprehensive plan for student support, including major campus communications, trainings for students, staff, and faculty, and a specialized therapy group. This workshop will explore that journey and outline strategies to facilitate undocumented student self-care and help reduce the stress for students navigating university processes with a hidden identity.

Expanding Programs Beyond First Gen
JRR Building, Room B60B
Conference Theme: The Identities We Hold

  • April Ruiz, Associate Dean of the College (Williams College)

  • Abstract: Williams College has support programming (e.g., Pre-Orientation) centering first generation college students. In this practice, however, a number of students who could benefit from this programming are left out. In this workshop, we will discuss how we can think beyond first gen when we identify our students who might need the most intentional guidance in transitioning to college and making it through college. In a collaboration between the Dean of the College office and the Admission & Financial Aid office, we are using data, student narratives, and other tools to expand the number of students invited into our programs and support communities. This is an effort in progress, and we are happy to share its genesis, how it's unfolding, and where we hope to go.

Faculty Engagement in First-Gen Student Initiatives: From Concept to Practice
JRR Building, Room B60C
Conference Theme: Collaboration for Institutional Change

  • Sarah Beth Bailey, Assistant Dean for New Students and Director of Student Success (New York University - College of Arts and Sciences)

  • Trace Jordan, Clinical Professor and Director of the Foundations of Science Inquiry Program (New York University)

  • Abstract: There are many elements to supporting and engaging first-gen students on your campus--peer mentoring, academic advising, alumni involvement, financial education, leadership development, programming, academic support, and this is just a small selection. While working to holistically support first-gen students on your campus, where does faculty engagement fall on your to-do list? What time and resources should be dedicated to engaging faculty members when supporting first-gen students? What strategies are successful when asking faculty members to give some of their already limited time to support first-gen students? How do you discover faculty members who self-identify as first-gen or are first-gen friendly to begin your work? This session seeks to answer these questions by sharing the story of how the College of Arts and Science at New York University created Proud to Be First in 2015. This is a working session and you will leave with a roadmap (created by each participant in the session) to engage faculty in first-gen initiatives on your campus. The session is interactive through leveraging the experiences of the presenters and participants in the room to build a plan for faculty engagement tailored specifically to your campus.

First To Go To…Graduate School: Empowering Students to Forge Their Path to Graduate and Professional School
JRR Building, Room 301
Conference Theme: Student Empowerment

  • Tiffany Decker, Senior Assistant Dean of Students (Columbia University - School of General Studies)

  • Abstract: All FGLI students can go to graduate or professional school with the right advising and institutional frameworks in place. Empowering FGLI students to believe that graduate or professional school is a viable option for their future endeavors requires that students see themselves as future graduate school students and that they understand the often bewildering institutional requirements necessary for them to take this next step. In the spring of 2016, Columbia’s School of General Studies - with one of the largest FGLI population in the Ivy League - set out to put the post-graduate needs of FGLI students at the center of our institutional advising and programming agenda. Our graduate school support framework, particularly, our Graduate School Coaching Program, has created a culture that defaults to students opting-in to post-graduate studies. By assuming that all students can have a “graduate school identity,” the Graduate School Coaching Program has achieved amazing outcomes - 100% of FGLI students who have completed the program have been accepted to graduate school. This session is an opportunity to explore together how to take the core values and frameworks established by this program to build norms and programs necessary for FGLI students to achieve their graduate school goals.

12:45 p.m. to 1:45 p.m.
Working Lunch: Home Group Discussion
Carl A. Fields Center, Multipurpose Room

1:45 p.m. to 2:00 p.m.
Group Photo

2:00 p.m. to 2:15 p.m.
BREAK

2:15 p.m. to 3:15 p.m.
Workshop Session three
JRR Building; Rooms 301, 399, B60A, B60B, & B60C

Beyond Silos: Collaborating Across Divisions to Build Comprehensive Systems of Support for FLI Students
JRR Building, Room 301
Conference Theme: Collaboration for Institutional Change

  • Casey Jo Dufresne, Program Director for the Meiklejohn Fellows Program (Amherst College)

  • Tenzin Kunor, Director of the Center for Diversity and Student Leadership (Amherst College)

  • Rick Lopez, Dean of First Year Students (Amherst College)

  • Abstract: This workshop will explore Amherst College’s institutional commitment to holistically supporting FLI students. Representatives from the Center for Diversity & Student Leadership, the Loeb Center for Career Exploration and Planning, and the Dean of New Students will reflect on their work to de-silo systems and resources on campus. As a demonstration of the college’s commitment to inclusion and equity, the workshop will model how to create an affirming space where students can learn to access and capitalize on campus resources through a Summer Bridge program coupled with intensive advising, identity and leadership development opportunities, and tailored post-graduation planning. Further, we will reflect on an institution-wide scaffolded approach to strengths based programming through highlighting and valuing experiential knowledge. The intentions are to affirm students by centering their identities as first gen and/or low-income students while also attempting to address internal policies, procedures, practices, which maintain structural inequalities.

Disruption From the Inside: The Role of Empowerment Agents
JRR Building, Room B60A
Conference Theme: Collaboration for Institutional Change

  • Shakima Clency, Associate Dean of Students for Student Empowerment and Director of First-Gen and Low-Income Student Support (Cornell University)

  • Abstract: The presentation will cover a brief overview of the concepts and mindsets needed to serve as effective empowerment agents. As part of this workshop, participants will have the opportunity to take a brief assessment to gauge how their actions align with the criteria of empowerment agents. Through personal reflection and group discussions, we will identify the benefits and challenges associated with disrupting institutional practices. The presentation will also highlight strategies to mobilize social capital networks to help FGLI students decode and navigate institutional spaces often not designed with their needs in mind. As the national conversation about FGLI students continues to evolve, we must use our positions and leverage institutional resources to create more inclusive environments for FGLI students to succeed and thrive. At the end of this presentation, hopefully, participants will walk away with a better understanding of why and how we must act boldly and strategically as empowerment agents to radically transform inequitable conditions by empowering and centering the experiences of FGLI students.

Sentiment, Sponsorship, and the Single Story: How to Ethically Share Our Students’ Stories While Fundraising
JRR Building, Room B60B
Conference Theme: The Identities We Hold

  • Kourtney Cockrell, Director of Student Enrichment Services (Northwestern University)

  • Khristina Gonzalez, Associate Dean of the College, Director of Programs for Access and Inclusion (Princeton University)

  • Abstract: The current public spotlight on the experience of first-generation, lower-income students has created an important moment for institutionalizing the structures needed to support and empower our student communities in order to create lasting change. Many of us collaborate closely with Advancement and Development offices who are working with alumni and other donors to ensure that there are resources available to support these long-term goals. In this work, we are often asked to share our students' stories in order to paint a more vivid picture of the experiences of our FGLI students on campus. But how do we share these narratives ethically, without sentimentalizing or reducing the complexity of their individual and diverse stories? In this workshop, Kourtney and Khristina will share some strategies for engaging in these conversations with potential donors, alumni supporters, and/or the public more broadly. Participants will have the opportunity to workshop their own communication strategies and to role-play conversations, while receiving peer and professional feedback.

Student Agency in Advising
JRR Building, Room B60C
Conference Theme: Student Empowerment

  • Javier Jiménez, Assistant Dean (Georgetown College)

  • Abstract: In the context of intrusive advising as an important model in advising first-generation, low-income students, this workshop aims to explore where does (institutional) intrusion end and student empowerment and responsibility begins. We will explore models of advising and how they connect with key identity and student development concepts. A key notion that we will strive to hold on to is the humanity of both students and advisors alike, their different positions and the dynamic nature and fluidity of the student-advisor relationship. Through this process, facilitators and participants will co-create criteria to move forward with this work in our everyday practice.

3:15 p.m. to 3:45 p.m.
BREAK

3:45 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Igniter Talks
Carl A. Fields Center, Multipurpose Room

Presenters will share their topic in five minutes or less, followed by an opportunity to engage in deeper conversation in small groups.

  • Serving as a “Near-Peer” and Fostering a Sense of Belonging Across Different Areas of a Professional Office
    Lucy Chin, Coordinator of Student Success Projects (Washington University in St. Louis)

  • Addressing Housing Insecurity During University Breaks
    Consuela Howell, Director, Office of Student Enrichment (University of Notre Dame); and Jaime Hermosillo, Program Coordinator, Student Support Services (The University of Chicago)

  • When Your Title Is The Director of Veteran, Transfer, Non-Traditional Student Programs: Navigating Intersectional Student Communities in an Office for Inclusion
    Keith Shaw, Director of Transfer, Non-Traditional, and Veteran Student Programs (Princeton University)

  • (Un)Covering The Gaps: How Might We Better Support FGLI Student by Examining the Support for International Students
    Benjamin Hughes, Director of Programming and Assessment for Diversity and Community Engagement, and Associate Director of the Office of Multicultural Affairs (Haverford College)

  • FLI@Stanford: More Than an Identity, It’s a Movement
    Adriena Brown, Assistant Director of FLI Programs (Stanford University); Jennifer Rolan, Assistant Dean and Associate Director of FLI Office (Stanford University); and Jennifer Roxas, Assistant Director of Career Catalysts (Stanford University)

6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
Networking Reception & Author Meet ‘n Greet
Palmer House, 1 Bayard Lane

Anthony Abraham Jack, Assistant Professor, Harvard University
Author of The Privileged Poor: How Elite Colleges Are Failing Disadvantaged Students
All conference attendees will receive an advanced copy of Jack’s book, and have an opportunity to meet the author and receive a signed copy.

About the Book: Getting in is only half the battle. The Privileged Poor reveals how—and why—disadvantaged students struggle at elite colleges, and explains what schools can do differently if these students are to thrive. The Ivy League looks different than it used to. College presidents and deans of admission have opened their doors—and their coffers—to support a more diverse student body. But is it enough just to admit these students? In The Privileged Poor, Anthony Jack reveals that the struggles of less privileged students continue long after they’ve arrived on campus. Admission, they quickly learn, is not the same as acceptance. This bracing and necessary book documents how university policies and cultures can exacerbate preexisting inequalities and reveals why these policies hit some students harder than others.

Despite their lofty aspirations, top colleges hedge their bets by recruiting their new diversity largely from the same old sources, admitting scores of lower-income black, Latino, and white undergraduates from elite private high schools like Exeter and Andover. These students approach campus life very differently from students who attended local, and typically troubled, public high schools and are often left to flounder on their own. Drawing on interviews with dozens of undergraduates at one of America’s most famous colleges and on his own experiences as one of the privileged poor, Jack describes the lives poor students bring with them and shows how powerfully background affects their chances of success.

If we truly want our top colleges to be engines of opportunity, university policies and campus cultures will have to change. Jack provides concrete advice to help schools reduce these hidden disadvantages—advice we cannot afford to ignore.


Tuesday, February 19

8:15 a.m. to 9:30 a.m.
Breakfast
Carl A. Fields Center, Multipurpose Room

8:30 a.m. to 9:15 a.m.
FGLI Consortium Business Meeting (Planning Committee Only)
Carl A. Fields Center, Class of 1985 Room

9:30 a.m. to 10:45 a.m.
Intersectionality in the FGLI Community
Carl A. Fields Center, Multipurpose Room

Shared Reading & Table Discussions

  • “Is the “First-Generation Student” Term Useful for Understanding Inequality? The Role of Intersectionality in Illuminating the Implications of an Accepted—Yet Unchallenged—Term.” Thai-Huy Nguyen, Seattle University and Bach Mai Dolly Nguyen, Lewis & Clark College

  • “De-marginalizing the Intersection of Race and Sex: A Black Feminist Critique of Antidiscrimination Doctrine, Feminist Theory and Antiracist Politics.” Kimberle Crenshaw

10:45 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.
BREAK

11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
College Access Partnerships & Collaboration Discussion
Carl A. Fields Center, Multipurpose Room

  • Rachel Carr: Chief Executive, IntoUniversity

  • Kourtney Cockrell: Director, Student Enrichment Services (Northwestern University)

  • Debbie Hannam: Co-founder, Trustee (Access and Accelerate Foundation)

  • Jason Klugman: Director, Princeton University Preparatory Program (Princeton University)

  • Chris Millward: Director for Fair Access and Participation, Office for Students (United Kingdom)

  • Christina Perry: Deputy Dean for Education, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences (Queen Mary University of London)

12:30 p.m. to 1:15 p.m.
Lunch & Action Planning
Carl A. Fields Center, Multipurpose Room

Action planning with your home college or organization

1:15 p.m. to 2:00 p.m.
Closing Activity
Carl A. Fields Center, Multipurpose Room

2:00 p.m.
Conference Ends